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Browse Prior Art Database

CIRCUITS TO ALLOW CARTRIDGE HOT-PLUGGING

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000062533D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Rowe, JT: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes circuitry for allowing a data cartridge to be "hot plugged" into an operating terminal, that is, to be inserted or removed without disrupting terminal operation. Buffer circuits are included to isolate the cartridge connector from the address/data/control busses to which it is logically connected.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 66% of the total text.

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CIRCUITS TO ALLOW CARTRIDGE HOT-PLUGGING

This article describes circuitry for allowing a data cartridge to be "hot plugged" into an operating terminal, that is, to be inserted or removed without disrupting terminal operation. Buffer circuits are included to isolate the cartridge connector from the address/data/control busses to which it is logically connected.

A microprocessor 10 communicates with a system memory 12 over a data bus 14, address bus 16 and control (read/write) bus 18 as in any conventional system. A system may employ a removable cartridge 20 capable of storing a program or data in non-volatile memory. The cartridge 20, although physically removeable, can be logically connected to the data, address and control busses through a connector 22. If the connector 22 is connected directly to the busses, contact bounce during the insertion or removal of a cartridge could produce glitches or noise on one or more lines. To avoid bus noise, buffer circuits are interposed between the cartridge connector 22 and the busses 14, 16 and 18. Buffers 24 and 26 receive address and control signals, respectively, being transmitted from the microprocessor 10 to the cartridge 20. Buffer 28 is a bidirectional buffer capable of transmitting data both to and from cartridge 20. Buffer 28 is kept in a high impedance state unless the presence of a cartridge 20 has been indicated by an interrupt signal provided directly to the microprocessor. One known type of cartridge detection...