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Method for Improving the Quality of Metal Deposited by Laser-Induced Decomposition of Organometallic Gases

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000062543D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ritsko, JJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Metals deposited on substrates by photolytic or photothermal laserinduced decomposition of organometallic gases are fine grained with poor electrical properties. By the inclusion of a few atomic percent of certain additional metals, chemically stimulated grain growth at low temperatures greatly increases grain size and film quality. State-of-the-art methods for depositing metals using laser-induced decomposition of organometallic gases by photolytic or photothermal processes do not produce high quality films. Fine grained deposits of single metallic elements usually contain some amount of carbon or organic fragments. The resistances of these deposits range from 3 to several hundred times that expected for the bulk crystalline (or large grained polycrystalline) metallic element.

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Method for Improving the Quality of Metal Deposited by Laser-Induced Decomposition of Organometallic Gases

Metals deposited on substrates by photolytic or photothermal laserinduced decomposition of organometallic gases are fine grained with poor electrical properties. By the inclusion of a few atomic percent of certain additional metals, chemically stimulated grain growth at low temperatures greatly increases grain size and film quality. State-of-the-art methods for depositing metals using laser- induced decomposition of organometallic gases by photolytic or photothermal processes do not produce high quality films. Fine grained deposits of single metallic elements usually contain some amount of carbon or organic fragments. The resistances of these deposits range from 3 to several hundred times that expected for the bulk crystalline (or large grained polycrystalline) metallic element. The electrical properties of the films are determined by grain size, method of grain growth and morphology as well as by the amount of carbonaceous material incorporated in the film, which can often be minimized if not eliminated by the choice of a laser process. Here, it is proposed to greatly increase the grain size, possibly enhancing the morphology, using the technique of chemically-stimulated, low temperature, grain growth. Incorporation of a few atomic percent of certain additional metallic elements in the laser deposition process causes large grain formation. The added metallic elements should form a solid solution with the host metal but thei...