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High Efficiency Optical Heating Device to Achieve Uniform Temperature Profiles on Substrate

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000062580D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Arjavalingam, G: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Optical front surface illumination is implemented for substrate heating (using a special image scheme containing a Fourier transform filter) in deposition processes. This highly efficient technique results in high temperature uniformity and allows for rapid change in substrate temperature. Also, energy is supplied to the active surface of the substrate. In a variety of deposition processes, notably molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and cold-walled chemical vapor deposition (CCVD), it is necessary to heat the substrate to temperatures of up to 900 - 1000ŒC over large areas. Traditionally this is accomplished by supplying radiant heat from the rear via a heater assembly.

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High Efficiency Optical Heating Device to Achieve Uniform Temperature Profiles on Substrate

Optical front surface illumination is implemented for substrate heating (using a special image scheme containing a Fourier transform filter) in deposition processes. This highly efficient technique results in high temperature uniformity and allows for rapid change in substrate temperature. Also, energy is supplied to the active surface of the substrate. In a variety of deposition processes, notably molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and cold-walled chemical vapor deposition (CCVD), it is necessary to heat the substrate to temperatures of up to 900 - 1000OEC over large areas. Traditionally this is accomplished by supplying radiant heat from the rear via a heater assembly. Such a technique results in extremely non-uniform temperature profiles across the substrate with the edges being colder than the center unless complex segmented heating assemblies are employed. Non-uniform profiles result in non-uniform growth and high defect densities. Besides the method is extremely wasteful and over 50% of the heat is radiated to the process chamber parts requiring complex cooling schemes, and resulting in the deterioration of the vacuum. Furthermore, heating takes place from the back while the active processes occur in the front. In addition, due to the large thermal inertia of the heating device, rapid changes in substrate temperature are difficult to achieve. This is an important consideration in MBE growth. The present device is designed to directly heat the substrate using a high power arc lamp. Since these lamps emit radiation in the visible and near ultraviolet region, the radiation is readily absorbed by the semiconductor on the substrate...