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Multiple Printer Support Using Parallel Buffering and a Uniform Intermediate Printer Data Stream

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000062637D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Trumble, MK: AUTHOR

Abstract

A method is described which allows the use of one set of algorithms to format a line of print, regardless of the implementation used by a particular printer. Some word processing programs use parallel buffering to simplify the formatting of a text document for printing. This is made possible by supporting the least common level of function for the small set of printers that is supported. Only the printer control sequences which are common to all the printers are used. Other functions, such as underscore and indexing, are implemented by overpasses on the print line. Because the control sequences which are interspersed with the printable data are of a known composition and length, it is possible to ignore them when repositioning text for overstriking, justification, etc.

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Multiple Printer Support Using Parallel Buffering and a Uniform Intermediate Printer Data Stream

A method is described which allows the use of one set of algorithms to format a line of print, regardless of the implementation used by a particular printer. Some word processing programs use parallel buffering to simplify the formatting of a text document for printing. This is made possible by supporting the least common level of function for the small set of printers that is supported. Only the printer control sequences which are common to all the printers are used. Other functions, such as underscore and indexing, are implemented by overpasses on the print line. Because the control sequences which are interspersed with the printable data are of a known composition and length, it is possible to ignore them when repositioning text for overstriking, justification, etc. Because of code space considerations, a method is needed to keep the same sort of simple formatting scheme, while supporting a higher level of function and a larger variety of printers. In accordance with the new method, instead of substituting the selected printer's control sequence into the data while formatting a line of text, an intermediate control sequence is inserted at formatting time. This sequence is the same regardless of the printer which is selected. These internal control sequences, unlike the actual printer controls, are always two bytes long. They consist of ESC (hex 1B) followed by the text single byte data stream control for the function. In the case of color, which is contained in a multi-byte text control, there is a simple mapping to a single byte...