Browse Prior Art Database

Rotating Substrate Potentiometer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000062642D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 69K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Orlandi, JV: AUTHOR

Abstract

The state-of-the-art potentiometer designs involve a fixed substrate with a separate rotating wiper contact. The potentiometer design described in this article eliminates the rotor and provides an improved electrical connection to the variable element through use of a rotating substrate. The disclosed rotating substrate concept effectively eliminates the need for a rotor, the substrate providing both the base for the conductive and resistive elements and, by rotation, a means for varying the resistance. A modification in substrate design is accomplished by the addition of two conductive elements to its surface, one on each side of the resistive element, as shown in Fig. 1. Three fixed (and isolated) contacts, one for each element, are required in the disclosed design.

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Rotating Substrate Potentiometer

The state-of-the-art potentiometer designs involve a fixed substrate with a separate rotating wiper contact. The potentiometer design described in this article eliminates the rotor and provides an improved electrical connection to the variable element through use of a rotating substrate. The disclosed rotating substrate concept effectively eliminates the need for a rotor, the substrate providing both the base for the conductive and resistive elements and, by rotation, a means for varying the resistance. A modification in substrate design is accomplished by the addition of two conductive elements to its surface, one on each side of the resistive element, as shown in Fig. 1. Three fixed (and isolated) contacts, one for each element, are required in the disclosed design. A cross-sectional drawing of the rotating substrate potentiometer is shown in Fig. 2.

A view of the case of the potentiometer is shown in Fig. 3. The design has the following advantages: 1. Elimination of the rotor and attaching leads to substrate.

2. Easily automated three-piece assembly.

3. Snap-type construction--no epoxy backfill

required.

4. Increase in developed length of resistive element

and allowable unit rotation due to reduction in

surface area formerly occupied by lead

attachments.

5. Overall reduction in package size.

6. Possible extension in application to a

surface-mounted device (construction could be all

ceramic or alumina with no internal soldered

j...