Browse Prior Art Database

Automatic Control of Camera Attached to Robot Manipulator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000062717D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Colson, JC: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The advent of machine vision on the manufacturing floor has presented a need to locate a wide variety of objects with a vision camera. The variation in size and contrast of the workpieces being viewed mandates different lens characteristics each part. Unique to this vision system is that the camera should be mountable on various robot axes, a feature included to extend the system's overall flexibility. The arrangement uses an adjustable lens with the vision camera and hardware (i.e., stepper motors) and software to control the lens settings.

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Automatic Control of Camera Attached to Robot Manipulator

The advent of machine vision on the manufacturing floor has presented a need to locate a wide variety of objects with a vision camera. The variation in size and contrast of the workpieces being viewed mandates different lens characteristics each part. Unique to this vision system is that the camera should be mountable on various robot axes, a feature included to extend the system's overall flexibility. The arrangement uses an adjustable lens with the vision camera and hardware (i.e., stepper motors) and software to control the lens settings.

Mounting a vision camera to a robot manipulator achieves the greatest flexibility inherent to a vision system employed for robotic assembly. One result of this mounting technique is that the distance between camera and object viewed may vary.

The arrangement includes three stepper motors to control zoom, focus and aperture, necessary drive and decode circuitry, or controlling software, motor and camera lens mount and cabling. These components may be categorized into three distinct subsystems: hardware, software, and mechanical linkage.

The hardware employed to drive the stepper motors is a straightforward up/down binary counting circuit attached to a conventional stepper motor driver circuit. The hardware receives a count, direction, and motor enable signals from the computer controlling the robot. It steps the appropriate motor(s) the desired number of counts and send...