Browse Prior Art Database

Grinding And Subsequent Machining of Magnetic Disk Substrates

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000062745D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Condas, GA: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Introduced here is a new method of preparing high quality substrates for the production of magnetic recording disks that improve manufacturing yields and costs. The new method proposed initially involves grinding raw substrates to make them flat, and then finishing them mechanically. The object is to produce flat substrates with an acceptable surface finish. Superficial grinding will easily produce a substrate flatness of less than 2 mils. Subsequent machining with, for example, a lathe, can easily produce an acceptable finish and resultant substrate flatness.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 79% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Grinding And Subsequent Machining of Magnetic Disk Substrates

Introduced here is a new method of preparing high quality substrates for the production of magnetic recording disks that improve manufacturing yields and costs. The new method proposed initially involves grinding raw substrates to make them flat, and then finishing them mechanically. The object is to produce flat substrates with an acceptable surface finish. Superficial grinding will easily produce a substrate flatness of less than 2 mils. Subsequent machining with, for example, a lathe, can easily produce an acceptable finish and resultant substrate flatness.

The present preparation of substrates by diamond machining alone will produce substrates with an excellent finish. However, the stress and subsequent deformation produced by the vacuum chuck usually used in such production, and the cutting tool, frequently produce substrates that do not meet the required flatness.

Grinding, on the other hand, is a time-consuming process if much stock removal is required, but it can quickly produce flat substrates. Consequently, the process proposed is an initial quick-grinding just for the purpose of producing a flat substrate, and then a subsequent machining to be used for stock removal, sizing, and producing the required surface finish. Since the substrate is now flat prior to machining, minimal machining is required.

The final proposed process will now produce substrates with less machining (e.g., lathe use) a...