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Process for Writing Pre-recorded Information On Optical Recording Disks

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000062747D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chen, M: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

An optical disk fabrication process utilizes a projection printing tool with a high power light source to directly print required pre-written information onto the recording med Specifically, the fabrication process has the following steps: (a)fabrication of a projection mask using existing photolithographic technologies; (b)coating of the disk substrate with the desire optical storage medium; and (c)laser projection printing of the desired pre-written information on the storage disk.

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Process for Writing Pre-recorded Information On Optical Recording Disks

An optical disk fabrication process utilizes a projection printing tool with a high power light source to directly print required pre-written information onto the recording med Specifically, the fabrication process has the following steps:
(a)fabrication of a projection mask using existing photolithographic technologies;
(b)coating of the disk substrate with the desire optical storage medium; and
(c)laser projection printing of the desired pre-written information on the storage disk.

In this manner, using a suitable mask, the necessary pre- written tracking and formatting information is produced on the recording disk using the same marking mechanism used for data recording. Note that this procedure can be used with a phase change material to print either phase or amplitude information. Similarly, read-only disks can be manufactured. The choice of the laser source must be based on its capability to deliver the required power densities over reasonably large areas with good duty cycle. In addition, the laser must have poor spatial coherence to avoid speckle formation on the projected image. Excimer lasers readily meet these requirements. Furthermore, they provide wavelengths in the deep ultraviolet which permit the attainment of finer resolution than can be achieved with conventional light sources. The process requires modification of the optics of projection printing tools to increase its optic...