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Detection of Entrapped Electrolyte

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000062773D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hartley, PA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Electrolyte that becomes trapped within circuit boards when plating the through-holes can be located by immersing the plated board in a bath of heated fluorocarbon and confining the outgassing vapors to the faulty holes with the use of a suitable through, i.e., transparent, mask.

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Detection of Entrapped Electrolyte

Electrolyte that becomes trapped within circuit boards when plating the through-holes can be located by immersing the plated board in a bath of heated fluorocarbon and confining the outgassing vapors to the faulty holes with the use of a suitable through, i.e., transparent, mask.

Plating electrolyte that becomes trapped within internal voids among the reinforcing fibers near plated through-holes in a circuit board can be heated sufficiently by immersion of the board to produce outgassing. The locations of the electrolyte pockets are determined by placing over one side of the board a transparent dimpled mask with a dimple being positioned to form a dome at each through-hole location. Mask and board are immersed in a bath of fluorocarbon liquid with the mask on the bottom to allow holes and domes to fill with the liquid. Mask and board are then inverted in the bath and the bath temperature raised to effect outgassing. Resulting bubbles are restrained by the mask domes to permit ready observation. Reworking can then occur to obviate the defect.

Disclosed anonymously.

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