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A Carbon Overcoated Thin Film Metal Alloy Magnetic Recording Disk With Laser-formed Optical Servo Tracks in the Carbon Overcoat

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000062788D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 8K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Castro, G: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Thin film metal alloy magnetic recording disks typically comprise a substrate, a cobalt-based magnetic layer and a protective overcoat of amorphous carbon deposited on the magnetic layer. A laser focused to a small spot is used to create optical servo tracks on the carbon overcoat. By controlling the laser power, the focused spot size and the rate at which the laser burns, a pattern of light and dark areas, the dark area being a film of intact carbon, can be formed on the carbon overcoat. The carbon is removed by the laser as carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. The spacing of the optical servo tracks is the same order of magnitude as that available in optical recording disks. The same technology as is used in optical recording is used to write the servo tracks and read the pattern from the carbon overcoat.

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A Carbon Overcoated Thin Film Metal Alloy Magnetic Recording Disk With Laser-formed Optical Servo Tracks in the Carbon Overcoat

Thin film metal alloy magnetic recording disks typically comprise a substrate, a cobalt-based magnetic layer and a protective overcoat of amorphous carbon deposited on the magnetic layer. A laser focused to a small spot is used to create optical servo tracks on the carbon overcoat. By controlling the laser power, the focused spot size and the rate at which the laser burns, a pattern of light and dark areas, the dark area being a film of intact carbon, can be formed on the carbon overcoat. The carbon is removed by the laser as carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. The spacing of the optical servo tracks is the same order of magnitude as that available in optical recording disks. The same technology as is used in optical recording is used to write the servo tracks and read the pattern from the carbon overcoat. The formation of the optical servo tracks by means of the laser also results in a texturizing of the carbon overcoat. This reduces the stiction between the read/write head and the carbon overcoat when the head is in contact with the carbon overcoat during start and stop operations of the disk file.

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