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Non-contact, Optical Method to Quantify Alodine Substrate Treatment for Magnetic Disks

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000062791D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 9K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Czworniak, KJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The Alodine conversion layer provides adhesion and substrate protection for magnetic disk coatings (Alodine is the Trademark of Amchem Corporation.) The Alodine treatment causes a roughening of the substrate. Thickness of the Alodine is quantified by x-ray analysis in addition to gravimetric changes in the disks after Alodine application. However, such analysis tends to average out microvariations of the coating. We have found a method to analyze the Alodine roughness using reflected light at a wavelength most sensitive to the surface topography. The method is fast, simple and provides good sensitivity to the porosity found in the Alodine processes studied so far.

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Non-contact, Optical Method to Quantify Alodine Substrate Treatment for Magnetic Disks

The Alodine conversion layer provides adhesion and substrate protection for magnetic disk coatings (Alodine is the Trademark of Amchem Corporation.) The Alodine treatment causes a roughening of the substrate. Thickness of the Alodine is quantified by x-ray analysis in addition to gravimetric changes in the disks after Alodine application. However, such analysis tends to average out microvariations of the coating. We have found a method to analyze the Alodine roughness using reflected light at a wavelength most sensitive to the surface topography. The method is fast, simple and provides good sensitivity to the porosity found in the Alodine processes studied so far. Blue- violet light is used to illuminate the surface and the reflected light is collected by a microscope objective that transmits the light up into a spectrophotometer that is set at 400 nm. The intensity at that wavelength is a quantification of the roughness. Higher reflected intensity means a rougher surface (greater porosi

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