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Starter Testing and Servicing Decisions

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000073360D
Original Publication Date: 1970-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 13K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Briney, LS: AUTHOR [+7]

Abstract

This computer operated automobile internal combustion engine diagnosis system uses a method for analyzing and diagnosing the condition of the starter while the starter and battery remain installed in the automobile. Cranking voltage, cranking current measured by a clamp on probe and cranking speed are used to test the starter. While the engine is cranking, the computer measures the battery current, battery voltage, and point open to point open time for each firing over 5 seconds of cranking. The computer stores the sum and number of values read for these three variables.

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Starter Testing and Servicing Decisions

This computer operated automobile internal combustion engine diagnosis system uses a method for analyzing and diagnosing the condition of the starter while the starter and battery remain installed in the automobile. Cranking voltage, cranking current measured by a clamp on probe and cranking speed are used to test the starter. While the engine is cranking, the computer measures the battery current, battery voltage, and point open to point open time for each firing over 5 seconds of cranking. The computer stores the sum and number of values read for these three variables.

The average battery voltage, average battery current, and average point open time are calculated from the data. The average point open time is used to calculate the cranking speed in rpm. The unloaded (engine off) battery voltage is also used. These values are compared to specifications. The engine off battery voltage is compared to a specified value such as 10.5 volts. The cranking voltage, current, and speed are compared to manufacturer''s specifications. Cranking voltage is specified as a single value, e.g., 9.6 volts, by all manufacturers. The current specification is the maximum current the starter should draw. Cranking speed is compared to a specified range of speeds.

The computer calls for replacing the starter if any of the following conditions is satisfied:

1) Unloaded battery voltage is more than 10.5 volts, cranking current more than maximum allowed, and cranking speed less than minimum, which indicates the starter is bad because it is not turning the engine over but is drawing a very high current.

2) Unloaded battery voltage is more than 10.5 volts, cranking voltage low, and cranking current more than maximum allowed, which indicates a shorted starter.

3) Unloaded battery voltage is more than 10.5 volts, cranking voltage equal to or above specification, cranking current more than maximum allowed, and cranking speed lower than minimum, which indicates that the starter is drawing too much current and not turning the engine over. Advice to adjust (starter shop check) r...