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Deposition of Germanium on a Germanium or Gallium Arsenide Substrate

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000073380D
Original Publication Date: 1970-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-22
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Berkenbilt, M: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This process relates to the use of a low temperature (350 degrees C) germanium di-iodide (GeI(2)) disproportionation reaction to form germanium single crystal growths in small openings in an oxide mask. Although originally intended as a method for the formation of an epitaxial emitter, this process is potentially useful in a number of device structures in which selected area depositions of semiconductor are desired.

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Deposition of Germanium on a Germanium or Gallium Arsenide Substrate

This process relates to the use of a low temperature (350 degrees C) germanium di-iodide (GeI(2)) disproportionation reaction to form germanium single crystal growths in small openings in an oxide mask. Although originally intended as a method for the formation of an epitaxial emitter, this process is potentially useful in a number of device structures in which selected area depositions of semiconductor are desired. The process steps are: 1) depositing silicon dioxide; delineating and etching a pattern of small holes in an oxide disposed on the surface of a germanium or gallium arsenide substrate by conventional oxidization and photoresist techniques; 2) treating the substrate in ozone (O(3)) to remove photoresist residue and then rinsing it in hot water with or without a buffered HF dip; 3) epitaxially depositing germanium within the apertures formed in the oxide by disproportionation of germanium from a germanium ditiodide species at a temperature of 350 degrees C.

Epitaxial growth is a function of the velocity and concentration of the GeI(2) species; the size and shape of the openings, deposition time and substrate orientation.

Using the above-described technique, an unusually high growth rate unexpectedly results in the small areas defined in the oxide mask. As a result of small exposed germanium areas surrounded by large areas of oxide, an enhanced supersaturation of germanium for depositio...