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Cathodic Etched Transparent Electrodes

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000073387D
Original Publication Date: 1970-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hyman, CE: AUTHOR

Abstract

Uniform and continuous geometrical electrode patterns are required in many electrical devices. Computer-controlled flat displays such as gas panels, electroluminescent panels and liquid crystal Panels are examples.

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Cathodic Etched Transparent Electrodes

Uniform and continuous geometrical electrode patterns are required in many electrical devices. Computer-controlled flat displays such as gas panels, electroluminescent panels and liquid crystal Panels are examples.

A cathodic reduction process for this purpose utilizes variable potentials which govern the rate of a reaction by which transparent conductive oxide films such as tin oxide, indium oxide and vanadium oxide are reduced to their respective metals. A glass or ceramic substrate 10 is coated with a film 12 of tin oxide or other metal oxide. A light-sensitive material (photoresist) is applied to film 12, and is exposed and developed to define the desired electrode or electrode pattern 14. Electrical contacts can be made to the exposed conductive metal oxide film as shown at 16. The metal oxide photoresist structure is placed, as a cathode, in a vessel 18 containing an aqueous solution of 5 to 10 percent acetic acid, together with a platinum sheet anode 20. With the application of an electric field of 5 to 10 volts per centimeter, the exposed transparent conductive coating 12 is reduced to its respective metal in 3 to 6 minutes. Although the portions of electroconductive metal oxide film 12 protected by the dielectric pattern 14 continue to adhere strongly to substrate 10, the metal resulting from the reduced portions adheres poorly to the substrate and can be easily removed by water washing.

The reaction can be localize...