Browse Prior Art Database

Skeleton Program System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000073432D
Original Publication Date: 1970-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-22
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fitzpatrick, JA: AUTHOR

Abstract

Program systems for commercial applications generally have the same external system design requirements. Namely, they are: capture and edit the input data, sort the edited data, update a master file, and write reports from the master file and from report tapes generated during the update step.

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Skeleton Program System

Program systems for commercial applications generally have the same external system design requirements. Namely, they are: capture and edit the input data, sort the edited data, update a master file, and write reports from the master file and from report tapes generated during the update step.

A generalized skeleton program system includes programs written to handle the common aspects of the edit, update and report writer steps. The portions of these programs that are not common are left to be coded and catalogued by the user. The generalized skeleton program branches to these custom user routines to complete the logic and allow execution of jobs. The skeleton program resides in main memory and is addressed by an incoming job. The skeleton program fetches the pertinent user module into memory and then turns over job control to the user module.

The user module then calls a linkage routine which is arranged to resolve all addressing between the skeleton program and the user module. The skeleton program and user modules are thus written independently and catalogued independently. The linkage routine resolves their addresses only during execution and thereby avoids the necessity of link-editing each user module to the skeleton program prior to execution. The skeleton program and the user modules maintain their independent nature, allowing multiple user modules to be fetched and executed without reloading the skeleton program.

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