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Browse Prior Art Database

Keyboard with Changeable Encoding and Key Designations

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000073481D
Original Publication Date: 1970-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 77K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, DO: AUTHOR

Abstract

This keyboard assembly 10 centers about a thin flexible underlay card 20 with appropriate key designations printed on it. The card 20 slips into position under transparent key buttons 30.

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Keyboard with Changeable Encoding and Key Designations

This keyboard assembly 10 centers about a thin flexible underlay card 20 with appropriate key designations printed on it. The card 20 slips into position under transparent key buttons 30.

The cross section through a key position illustrates two similar but slightly different key buttons 30' and 30''. The transparent key buttons are flexibly supported in a grid-like matrix 32. Pressing a key button 30 depresses a flap portion 21 of the overlay card directly under the button with a character printed on it. The flap in turn deflects a spring mounted actuator button 36. The actuator button 36 presses on a portion of a rubber pad 38 which in turn forces an upper flexibly supported printed circuit contact 40 to make electrical contact with the corresponding lower contact 42. A closure of this switch activates the encoding electronics and, thus, the keyboard output.

The transparent plastic key buttons 30 each have an upper and a lower curved surface which acts as a lens to obtain magnification of the printed character and facilitates tactile finger location. A small nib, 44' or 44'' in the center of the keys protects the lower lens surface from scratching and wear. The protrusions 46 around the lower edges of the buttons act as mechanical stops to prevent transmission of high forces and, thus, protect the elastic diaphragm switch.

The underlay card 20 is made of a thin (approximately .010 in. thick) plastic upon which the characters are printed. The card is pre-punched to form the small flaps 21, one for each character, to minimize flexure forces. Alternati...