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Integrated Circuit Chip Positioning Tool

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000073532D
Original Publication Date: 1970-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Schuelke, WJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Integrated circuit chips, manufactured in large quantities and of single type are, handled by automatic chip positioning machines which are designed primarily to align and position the integrated circuit chips on substrates and are adapted to handle large numbers of the same kind of chip, These machines utilize vibratory feed bowls which require a rather large quantity in the feed bowl so as to efficiently feed chips to the chip feed apparatus. As integrated circuits have become more complex, more varied part numbers have been necessitated while requiring only a few chips of the same kind at the chip joining station. In order to adapt these chip positioning machines to the smaller quantity or different part numbers, it has been necessary to orient and position the chips by hand.

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Integrated Circuit Chip Positioning Tool

Integrated circuit chips, manufactured in large quantities and of single type are, handled by automatic chip positioning machines which are designed primarily to align and position the integrated circuit chips on substrates and are adapted to handle large numbers of the same kind of chip, These machines utilize vibratory feed bowls which require a rather large quantity in the feed bowl so as to efficiently feed chips to the chip feed apparatus.

As integrated circuits have become more complex, more varied part numbers have been necessitated while requiring only a few chips of the same kind at the chip joining station. In order to adapt these chip positioning machines to the smaller quantity or different part numbers, it has been necessary to orient and position the chips by hand. The apparatus described below permits the orientation, alignment, and positioning of a small number of chips which is dependent on a machine rather than the skill of an operator and which is easily set up despite changes in part numbers and type.

Initially an off-line operation is performed to roughly line up chips in rows, such as the chip 10, contacts down on the surface of a mirror 11. The mirror is positioned on a pedestal 12 which may be raised and lowered so as to focus the contacts of the chip through the lens system of a microscope 13. The operator when viewing the chip through the microscope, sees the reflected image of the chip and roughl...