Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

A method to display to the user a percentage of a document or form that has changed since the last archival

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000073566D
Original Publication Date: 2005-Feb-22
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 33K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

What is presented is a set of visual cues which indicate the amount of data that has changed in a word processing or data entry program. In addition, an indication as to how soon an automatic archival is about to commence is shown.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

A method to display to the user a percentage of a document or form that has changed since the last archival

A common frustration to users of editor or database programs is the loss of data through accident or mechanical failure. Typically, users are typing away, entering data and then when it comes to saving the file, an error occurs and the data is lost. Or, the user's computer has a hard failure during data input and the work done thus far is lost.

Some programs have a solution to this which is a constant archival of the current file at set time intervals or amount of data input. But, this type of automated archival takes away user control of their program. i.e. a draft change to a current file is "saved" without the user wishing for this to occur. Thus, the original version of the file is overwritten without the user wishing for the changes to be saved. As a consequence, some editor or data input programs then allow the user to turn off automatic archival.

What is needed is a visual guide to manual and automated archival.

There are two ideas here which can be used independently or in conjunction with each other.

First, take the case where a delta change meter is in effect. The initial assumption (in this description) is that automatic archival is turned off. Then as the user edits a file or database, the amount of information input into the file is compared to the last saved version of the file. In the menu bar, a "percentage delta" counter shows how much the user has changed in the current file versus the file currently on the disk platter. So of course, initial changes to the file would most likely start in the single digits. How...