Browse Prior Art Database

Processing and Storing Executable Program Data

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000073600D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 54K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bequaert, FC: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Conversational, interactive computer programs normally require large amounts of computer main storage to hold the data used in communicating with their users, and the instructions used to process users' responses. These storage requirements can become so large as to make the programs unwieldy, difficult to edit, debug, and maintain, and occasionally impossible to store. The technique described attacks this problem in two ways: first, it allows the developer of an interactive program to store large parts of the program data on external storage devices, and to edit easily the data so stored; and second it provides the program, at execution time, with interpretive routines which permit it to obtain access to and process the stored data rapidly and efficiently.

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Processing and Storing Executable Program Data

Conversational, interactive computer programs normally require large amounts of computer main storage to hold the data used in communicating with their users, and the instructions used to process users' responses. These storage requirements can become so large as to make the programs unwieldy, difficult to edit, debug, and maintain, and occasionally impossible to store. The technique described attacks this problem in two ways: first, it allows the developer of an interactive program to store large parts of the program data on external storage devices, and to edit easily the data so stored; and second it provides the program, at execution time, with interpretive routines which permit it to obtain access to and process the stored data rapidly and efficiently.

The developer of the program creates a set of program statements in some language appropriate to the programming problem 1. Typically, the language would be a standard, already available language which has been extended with a set of special instructions. The program statements written in this language are given as input to a special extension to the standard processor for the language being used, here called the Processor Extension 2. The processor extension recognizes the standard language statements, and passes them through unmodified to the standard processor 3. However, the extended language statements are trapped and processed as shown inside 2. First, the data contained in these statements is stored in an orderly manner on an exter...