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Nematic Liquid Crystal Mixtures

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000073601D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 30K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cox, RJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Room temperature liquid crystals are prepared using novel members of a well-known class of chemical compounds designated as anils or Schiff-bases. Specifically these novel compounds are the 4'-methyl anil of 4-(3-methoxypropoxy)-benzaldehyde (I) the 4'-butyl anil of 4-(3-methoxypropoxy)-benzaldehyde (II), and the 4'-butyl anil of 4-pentoxybenzaldehyde (III). These compounds are found to have melting points below room temperature; (I) and (II) form monotropic nematic phases, while (III) is enantiotropic smectic. To obtain room temperature nematic liquids, useful for display applications, they can be mixed among each other or with other anils in such manner that either the aldehyde or aniline portions of the anils are common.

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Nematic Liquid Crystal Mixtures

Room temperature liquid crystals are prepared using novel members of a well-known class of chemical compounds designated as anils or Schiff-bases. Specifically these novel compounds are the 4'-methyl anil of 4-(3- methoxypropoxy)-benzaldehyde (I) the 4'-butyl anil of 4-(3-methoxypropoxy)- benzaldehyde (II), and the 4'-butyl anil of 4-pentoxybenzaldehyde (III). These compounds are found to have melting points below room temperature; (I) and (II) form monotropic nematic phases, while (III) is enantiotropic smectic. To obtain room temperature nematic liquids, useful for display applications, they can be mixed among each other or with other anils in such manner that either the aldehyde or aniline portions of the anils are common. For example, a typical mixture having a melting well below room temperature can consist of 63 parts of
(II) and 37 parts of (III). This mixture yields a liquid crystal composition having anematic range, which lower limit is set by the transition to a smectic phase at 24 degrees C and an upper limit at 37 degrees C. This mixture has the advantage in that by simply changing proportions of the components the upper and lower limits of nematic temperature range may be changed anywhere in the neighborhood of room temperature, while maintaining a nematic range of approximately 13 degree C.

These compounds can also be mixed with some higher melting nematogenic compounds which are not of the anil type. For example, a c...