Browse Prior Art Database

Production of Carbon and Metallic Films

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000073793D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-23
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kuptsis, JD: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Physical characterization of materials by interaction with an electron beam is often complicated by the contamination of the sample surface due to the deposition of carbon. Illustrative technologies utilizing an electron beam are electron microscopy, electron microprobe spectroscopy and electron diffraction. The carbon build-up is attributed to the decomposition of hydrocarbons present on the sample surface or as a residual gas in the vacuum chamber. The decomposition of the gaseous phase leads to the deposition of the nonvolatile constituent on the sample surface. This effect is used for the production of thin films as illustrated in the Drawing.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 63% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Production of Carbon and Metallic Films

Physical characterization of materials by interaction with an electron beam is often complicated by the contamination of the sample surface due to the deposition of carbon. Illustrative technologies utilizing an electron beam are electron microscopy, electron microprobe spectroscopy and electron diffraction. The carbon build-up is attributed to the decomposition of hydrocarbons present on the sample surface or as a residual gas in the vacuum chamber. The decomposition of the gaseous phase leads to the deposition of the nonvolatile constituent on the sample surface. This effect is used for the production of thin films as illustrated in the Drawing.

Electrons emerging from the filament are accelerated to the desired energy level and focused on the sample surface by an electromagnetic lens. The sample chamber is isolated from the rest of the system except for an orifice for the transmission of the electron beam. This arrangement permits the admission of gases, whose presence is undesirable in the electron optical section of the instrument. Volatile hydrides, such as borane, silane, germane, and arsine may be admitted via the gas inlet system for the deposition of B, Si, Ge and As. Metal carbonyls are another source of volatile metal compounds. An orifice diameter 1/8" is adequate for a source chamber pressure of 10/-3/ mm and a main chamber pressure of 10/-5/ mm with a permissible pressure rise of 1% at a pumping speed of 100...