Browse Prior Art Database

Magnetic Film Memory

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000073796D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-23
Document File: 2 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bertelsen, BI: AUTHOR

Abstract

This is a structure and process to minimize required word drive (therefor, word drive amplitude) by applying a constant amplitude magnetic field bias on the storage film 10 in its hard direction. This is accomplished by: 1) Vacuum depositing or sputtering a palladium or platinum doped NiFe storage film 10. The doping provides resistance to magnetic annealing. 2) Vacuum depositing or sputtering an overlayer 12 of high cobalt concentration NiFeCo with its easy axis orthogonal to the storage layer 10. This bias layer 12, which couples to the storage film 10 by magnetic exchange, is substantially thinner than the storage film 10. The high cobalt concentration, coupled with a deposition temperature substantially lower than that used during deposition of the storage film 10, provides very high Hc and Hk in the bias layer 12.

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Magnetic Film Memory

This is a structure and process to minimize required word drive (therefor, word drive amplitude) by applying a constant amplitude magnetic field bias on the storage film 10 in its hard direction. This is accomplished by: 1) Vacuum depositing or sputtering a palladium or platinum doped NiFe storage film 10. The doping provides resistance to magnetic annealing. 2) Vacuum depositing or sputtering an overlayer 12 of high cobalt concentration NiFeCo with its easy axis orthogonal to the storage layer 10. This bias layer 12, which couples to the storage film 10 by magnetic exchange, is substantially thinner than the storage film 10. The high cobalt concentration, coupled with a deposition temperature substantially lower than that used during deposition of the storage film 10, provides very high Hc and Hk in the bias layer 12. These materials and process steps permit applying the desired bias layer 12 without losing control over the easy axis direction initially built into the storage film 10.

In operation, the bias produced by bias layer 12 aids the word-read and write fields produced by word pulses applied to word lines 14 and, because of the very high Hk and the thinness of the bias layer 12, there is minimal reduction of bit field, produced by pulses applied to bit/sense lines 16, at storage film 10 due to the permeability of the bias layer 12. Word lines 14 and bit/sense lines 16 are, of course, suitably insulated from each other. Other essentia...