Browse Prior Art Database

Interconnection of Optical Fibers to Planar Optical Integrated Circuitry

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000073812D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-23
Document File: 2 page(s) / 77K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ash, EA: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

An important technological problem in the application of thin-film optical integrated circuitry to optical communications, e.g., between computers or between cities, and also in the coupling between computer subsystems, is the interconnection of optical fibers ~0.5-10mu in diameter with a thin film optical processing network.

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Interconnection of Optical Fibers to Planar Optical Integrated Circuitry

An important technological problem in the application of thin-film optical integrated circuitry to optical communications, e.g., between computers or between cities, and also in the coupling between computer subsystems, is the interconnection of optical fibers ~0.5-10mu in diameter with a thin film optical processing network.

A single fiber may be laid down on and attached to a thin-film waveguide as shown in Drawing A. For single mode propagation, if the propagation vector component k along the axis of the fiber matches k(g) in the planar waveguide, a periodic exchange of energy between the two waveguides will take place, and a large efficiency of coupling into the planar waveguide can be obtained if a proper coupling length is chosen. If k(g) not equal, k(f), efficient coupling can be still made to occur by introducing a periodicity of repetition distance d into the coupling such that k(g)not equal k(f) = (2pi/d)m where m is an integer. If k(g) and k(f) are sufficiently close, d may be much larger than the guide dimensions. As shown in Drawing B, A convenient means for introducing the periodicity is to coat highly reflecting metal stripes on the planar waveguide before attaching the fiber. The stripes may be used to bond the fiber to the base waveguide without the use of adhesives. A high voltage is applied to the stripes and bonding occurs between the insulating fiber, e.g., glass or plastic, and the metal film on application of the voltage. The bonding mechanism is believed to be diffusion of...