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Conductor Crossings in Monolithic Circuits

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000073817D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-23
Document File: 2 page(s) / 75K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Berger, HH: AUTHOR

Abstract

Conductor crossings in monolithic circuits are best realized by appropriately extending the electrode of an active component, such as transistor, and by effectively utilizing the topology of the whole system. The extended conductive region of the component serves as an underpass for a first conductor path and is crossed by at least one conductor, whereby insulation between the two crossed conductors is ensured by a dielectric layer. A layout requires only one metallization plane even for circuits with a plurality of crossings, such as, for example, storage matrices.

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Conductor Crossings in Monolithic Circuits

Conductor crossings in monolithic circuits are best realized by appropriately extending the electrode of an active component, such as transistor, and by effectively utilizing the topology of the whole system. The extended conductive region of the component serves as an underpass for a first conductor path and is crossed by at least one conductor, whereby insulation between the two crossed conductors is ensured by a dielectric layer. A layout requires only one metallization plane even for circuits with a plurality of crossings, such as, for example, storage matrices.

The Figure shows a detailed view of the matrix metallization plane after etching for an integrated memory circuit using the principle stated in the preceding paragraph. In the half cell, formed in the shape of an angular C, an emitter E1 with only one contact 11 is arranged in the right top part. The upper contact 12 of the second emitter E2 is shown on the left at about the same level as the emitter E1. Emitter E2 is extended to occupy most of the vertical part of the angular C. A second contact 13 is arranged slightly above the left bottom corner of the C on the lower end of the extended emitter E2, while base contact 14, disposed in the left bottom corner of the C, simultaneously represents a pole of the coupling resistor RC, not shown. Collector contact 15 is shown in the right bottom corner of the angular C, whereas contact Q1, corresponding to the second pole of coupling resistor RC, is arranged in the open part of the C. The half cell, provided with the above contact designations in...