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Browse Prior Art Database

Computerized Meter Reading System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000073909D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-23
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Midland, B: AUTHOR

Abstract

A computer transmits simultaneously a plurality of frequencies via a phone in parallel to each dial of a meter. The particular digit reading is denoted according to the binary coded combination of these frequencies passed by a detector associated with each contact position of the meter and transmitted back by the phone to the computer.

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Computerized Meter Reading System

A computer transmits simultaneously a plurality of frequencies via a phone in parallel to each dial of a meter. The particular digit reading is denoted according to the binary coded combination of these frequencies passed by a detector associated with each contact position of the meter and transmitted back by the phone to the computer.

Sounds at preselected different frequencies are concurrently transmitted from CPU 11 (see A) via telephone exchange 12 sequentially to a predetermined series of phones 13 associated with meters 14, or the like, to be interrogated. The earpiece of each 13 is connected via wire 15 in parallel to contact arms 16, each associated with a respective dial 17a, b, n of 14.

As shown in B, each dial 17 has ten equally spaced contacts 0-9 corresponding to the decimal digits on a conventional meter. Arm 16 is mechanically driven (e.g., by water pressure if water meter) to sweep contacts 0- 9. Suitable means such as slightly inclined transverse contact extensions 18 (see C assure that arm 16 will always positively contact one of the contacts 0-9. Each contact is connected to a respective frequency detector 19, preset to pass a different binary coded combination of four frequencies for each contact 0-9 of the various dials 17a, b, n.

While the code combinations for each unit position 0-5 may be the same for each dial 17a, b, or n, detectors 19 for each dial are set to pass a different four frequencies; e.g., 19 for 17a passes 10, 20, 30 and 40 Hz; 19 for 17b passes 50, 60, 70, 80 Hz; and 19 for 17n, passes 90, 100, 110, 120 Hz. But for 17a, b and n, the detector...