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Cartesian Memory Programmable

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000073928D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-23
Document File: 3 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dailey, JR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A technique is provided for encoding X, Y coordinate information into cells of a functional memory device wherein each cell has four possible states for this example represented by (11), (10), (01) and (00). The encoding is optimal or complete since an n quaternary cell word can encode as many points as there are possible word states. The state of the quaternary cell denotes direction (Cartesian coordinate), and the cell position in a word or string indicates the magnitudes. All possible points of a 2n x 2n array, where n is the number of quaternary cells in a string, can be addressed. (This concept can be extended to include cell states beyond quaternary for algorithms requiring a higher number of array points.)

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Cartesian Memory Programmable

A technique is provided for encoding X, Y coordinate information into cells of a functional memory device wherein each cell has four possible states for this example represented by (11), (10), (01) and (00). The encoding is optimal or complete since an n quaternary cell word can encode as many points as there are possible word states. The state of the quaternary cell denotes direction (Cartesian coordinate), and the cell position in a word or string indicates the magnitudes. All possible points of a 2n x 2n array, where n is the number of quaternary cells in a string, can be addressed. (This concept can be extended to include cell states beyond quaternary for algorithms requiring a higher number of array points.)

In A, a rectangular or Cartesian assignment is made in space in both the X and Y directions from the origin "0" of a display field to provide four quadrants 11, 01, 00, 10. The table in A shows bit strings corresponding to positions C - G to illustrate the selection of any one of 64 positions in each quadrant or a total of 256 positions for the display. The most significant position is in column 1, and the least significant position is in column 4. Each position in a cell string corresponds to an absolute dimension in the X or Y direction which is one-half of that in the preceding higher significance position.

To locate point C, the 11 bit pair in column 1 defines position 1, which is one- half of the maximum distance in both the X and Y "1" directions in quadrant 1. The next significant bit pair is 11, which defines point 2; the next lower significance 11 bit pair defines point 3; and finally, the least significant 11 bit pair finally locates point C, as illustrated. Note that each lower significance bit pair in a word corresponds to a change in dimension which is one-half of that of the next preceding value; and that each time we locate an intermediate point such as 1, it acts as the origin for a smaller 4-quadrant disp...