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Lithographic Printing Plate

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000073959D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-23
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Anderson, HR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Extremely long wearing printing plates are produced utilizing conventional materials with only slight variations from standard processing techniques. In making such printing plates, a standard silver halide gelatin photographic emulsion coated on an aluminum substrate is utilized. This plate is exposed to information using standard photographic techniques, developed with any of the well-known hardening developer solutions, and washed with warm water to remove gelatin from nonimage areas. Prior to baking to cross-link the gelatin in the image areas, the plate is treated to provide for the removal of substantial amounts of imbibed water. This removal of water allows for baking of the plate without degradation of the gelatin at normal baking temperatures, up to about 275 degrees C.

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Lithographic Printing Plate

Extremely long wearing printing plates are produced utilizing conventional materials with only slight variations from standard processing techniques. In making such printing plates, a standard silver halide gelatin photographic emulsion coated on an aluminum substrate is utilized. This plate is exposed to information using standard photographic techniques, developed with any of the well-known hardening developer solutions, and washed with warm water to remove gelatin from nonimage areas. Prior to baking to cross-link the gelatin in the image areas, the plate is treated to provide for the removal of substantial amounts of imbibed water. This removal of water allows for baking of the plate without degradation of the gelatin at normal baking temperatures, up to about 275 degrees C. Additionally, drying of the plate allows baking at temperatures greater than 275 degrees C, which temperatures have previously been considered to be deleterious to such a plate.

Drying of a plate containing a developed gelatin relief image may be by any number of means. The plate may be air dried under ambient conditions over an extended period of time; it may be placed in a heated drying environment over a shorter period of time; the plate may be exposed to successively increasing temperature gradients during which water is removed at the lower temperatures before the high baking temperatures are reached. This latter method is amenable to automated processing...