Browse Prior Art Database

Bulk and Surface Properties of Magnetic Oxides

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000074013D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-23
Document File: 2 page(s) / 32K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Engel, JM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Described is a nondestructive method for determining surface charge and physical properties of thin magnetic oxide coatings by probing the coating with a narrow beam of energetic electrons. Two separate detectors for secondary and back-scattered electrons permit simultaneous study of the surface and the bulk properties of the coating, composition variations and topology.

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Bulk and Surface Properties of Magnetic Oxides

Described is a nondestructive method for determining surface charge and physical properties of thin magnetic oxide coatings by probing the coating with a narrow beam of energetic electrons. Two separate detectors for secondary and back-scattered electrons permit simultaneous study of the surface and the bulk properties of the coating, composition variations and topology.

An electron beam, having a cross-sectional diameter of a micron or less, can be selectively addressed to a single spot or raster scanned over a larger area. The depth of primary electron beam penetration can be readily varied up to approximately several microns by appropriate choice of accelerating voltage. The impinging primary electrons produce two general categories of "secondary" electrons, viz., low-energy electrons (less than 50 electron volts) coming from the uppermost surface and higher energy electrons coming from deeper layers.

In one configuration, the primary electron beam 1 is scanned across the oxide surface 2, or through the thin coating to the substrate 3, or the oxide coated substrate is moved under a stationary electron beam. For various primary beam voltages, the electrons will penetrate different depths. The secondary electrons 4 are used to study surface properties by deflecting them to a low- voltage grid 5, and accelerating them through a field produced by a higher- potential or grid 10 in order to produce photons in the scinti...