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Hypersensitization of Photographic Emulsions

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000074104D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-23
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Faigenbaum, MA: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The following treatment of Kodak High Resolution (glass) plates increases sensitivity (e.g., for faster or lower intensity point-by-point artwork exposures) and gamma (for enhanced image sharpness). Under nonactinic conditions: 1) The antihalation coating on the reverse side of the plate is covered by a protective film of plastic (e.g., saran taped to the reverse side). 2) The plate is immersed in an alkaline solution of 1.16 grams NaOH dissolved in 1 liter distilled water (solution temperature 68 degrees F; immersion time 30 seconds). 3) The plate is removed and dried (in pressurized air). The plate is then immediately useful for exposure although the emulsion may still contain water.

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Hypersensitization of Photographic Emulsions

The following treatment of Kodak High Resolution (glass) plates increases sensitivity (e.g., for faster or lower intensity point-by-point artwork exposures) and gamma (for enhanced image sharpness). Under nonactinic conditions:
1) The antihalation coating on the reverse side of the

plate is covered by a protective film of plastic

(e.g., saran taped to the reverse side).
2) The plate is immersed in an alkaline solution of 1.16

grams NaOH dissolved in 1 liter distilled water (solution

temperature 68 degrees F; immersion time 30 seconds).
3) The plate is removed and dried (in pressurized air).

The plate is then immediately useful for exposure

although the emulsion may still contain water.

However, air drying for several hours prior to

exposure may be more desirable as the drier emulsion

is less susceptible to abrasion.
4) The plastic backing on the reverse side is removed.

Comparisons of samples of treated and untreated exposed plates indicate that the treatment produces 100% increase in sensitivity without increased fog level. This means that exposure time can be reduced by 50% for a given exposure energy, or energy can be reduced for a desired exposure time.

Sharpened transitions are observed between clear and dark areas on the photographs obtained from the pretreated plates.

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