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Substrate Interfacial Polymerization of Conformal Coatings

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000074114D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-23
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Balan, AL: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This is an improved process for applying a continuous conformal coating onto a varied geometrically configured substrate by initially depositing a thin film of initiator material on the substrate that is to be coated. The wetted substrate is then immersed into a coating resin bath, remaining there for a time period sufficient to permit a thin film formation. The interfacial polymerization is accomplished while the substrate remains immersed in the bath solution. The bath solution remains unpolymerized while a polymer film is formed at the substrate interface. The coating thickness is a function of time that the substrate remains immersed in the solution, materials used, and the concentration of the bath materials.

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Substrate Interfacial Polymerization of Conformal Coatings

This is an improved process for applying a continuous conformal coating onto a varied geometrically configured substrate by initially depositing a thin film of initiator material on the substrate that is to be coated. The wetted substrate is then immersed into a coating resin bath, remaining there for a time period sufficient to permit a thin film formation. The interfacial polymerization is accomplished while the substrate remains immersed in the bath solution. The bath solution remains unpolymerized while a polymer film is formed at the substrate interface. The coating thickness is a function of time that the substrate remains immersed in the solution, materials used, and the concentration of the bath materials.

For example, spring-type contacts dipped into a toluene solution of stannous octoate were thereafter immersed in a coating resin formulation. A gel was formed at the metal surfaces and the part then withdrawn from the coating solution. The resultant film was uniformly thin and continuously conformal, particularly over the sharp corners and projections of the device being coated.

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