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Controlling a Driver Program

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000074140D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-23
Document File: 2 page(s) / 52K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bauer, RA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A method is provided for controlling a driver program in a stored program computer system. The driver program is responsive to application variables defined by the programmer who writes the application program. The number of application variables is arbitrary, but as a practical matter, three variables suffice in most instances. An application task or transaction to take place is defined by a number. This number defines test conditions which must be passed by a record in a table of records in order for the record to cause a return of a set of application variables to the driver program.

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Controlling a Driver Program

A method is provided for controlling a driver program in a stored program computer system. The driver program is responsive to application variables defined by the programmer who writes the application program. The number of application variables is arbitrary, but as a practical matter, three variables suffice in most instances. An application task or transaction to take place is defined by a number. This number defines test conditions which must be passed by a record in a table of records in order for the record to cause a return of a set of application variables to the driver program.

The application task number in A (assume, for example, number 22310) is sent by the program to the application driver program which in turn sends it to the table analyzer program. The table analyzer uses the task number to test each record in the logic extension table. The digits of the task number test corresponding position numbers in a record, i.e., the first digit of the task number, tests the number in position #1 of the record, etc. The numbers are shown in the table B, as decimal numbers, but in the system are actually binary numbers. The value of the first digit of the task number, i.e., (2), determines the bit position, i.e., the second bit position, of the binary record position number, i.e., (00007=0000000111) to be tested and this bit position must be a one in order for the record position number to pass the test. In this instance, the numb...