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Eliminating Clear Type Mask Defects in Positive Resist

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000074159D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-23
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lajza, JJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

This is a process whereby through the use of multiple exposures to positive photoresist, defects in the resistive coatings can be eliminated. The method comprises the application of positive photoresist to a wafer by suitable techniques, such as spinning, the alignment of the mask with the desired geometries, exposure under ultraviolet light for onehalf the required exposure time, the development of the exposed portion of the photoresist if desired, the realignment of a second mask that was generated from a different mask master, exposure under ultra-violet light for the additional required exposure time, followed by development and etch. Any defect which occurs on only one mask will produce only a step in the photoresist, leaving sufficient resist on the surface for protection of the substrate during subsequent etching.

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Eliminating Clear Type Mask Defects in Positive Resist

This is a process whereby through the use of multiple exposures to positive photoresist, defects in the resistive coatings can be eliminated. The method comprises the application of positive photoresist to a wafer by suitable techniques, such as spinning, the alignment of the mask with the desired geometries, exposure under ultraviolet light for onehalf the required exposure time, the development of the exposed portion of the photoresist if desired, the realignment of a second mask that was generated from a different mask master, exposure under ultra-violet light for the additional required exposure time, followed by development and etch. Any defect which occurs on only one mask will produce only a step in the photoresist, leaving sufficient resist on the surface for protection of the substrate during subsequent etching. This process thus produces only the well defined fully developed geometries which were present on both masks.

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