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Magnetically Ordered Fluoride Compounds

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000074209D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-23
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

McGuire, TR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A new class of magnetic compounds of the type formula Cs(4)M(3)F(10) (where M = Fe/++/, Co/++/, Ni/++/), are prepared. The unique feature of these compounds is that they are magnetically ordered in only two dimensions - a rare occurrence among magnetic materials. The cobalt compound is a ferromagnet with a T(c) of 35 degrees K and a moment of 15-16 emu/gram. The other compounds are essentially antiferromagnets but seem to have a canting of the spins below the Neel temperature. All of these compounds can be obtained in rather large transparent single crystals. Materials such as these have possible application as optical elements for the modulation and control of light by using magnetooptic effects. A second application is the use of these materials as memory storage elements by using individual magnetic domains.

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Magnetically Ordered Fluoride Compounds

A new class of magnetic compounds of the type formula Cs(4)M(3)F(10) (where M = Fe/++/, Co/++/, Ni/++/), are prepared. The unique feature of these compounds is that they are magnetically ordered in only two dimensions - a rare occurrence among magnetic materials. The cobalt compound is a ferromagnet with a T(c) of 35 degrees K and a moment of 15-16 emu/gram. The other compounds are essentially antiferromagnets but seem to have a canting of the spins below the Neel temperature. All of these compounds can be obtained in rather large transparent single crystals. Materials such as these have possible application as optical elements for the modulation and control of light by using magnetooptic effects. A second application is the use of these materials as memory storage elements by using individual magnetic domains. This is capable of high-density storage of information. A third application involves the layer structure of these materials. At oblique angles diffraction effects of polarized light might take place. This could then be modulated by an applied magnetic field.

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