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A Variable Datalength Assembly Language

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000074273D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-23
Document File: 3 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Braudaway, GW: AUTHOR

Abstract

The Variable Datalength Assembly Language (VDAL) is a System/360 symbolic language usable for analytical operational programming of the IBM System/4 Pi computer family. Employing it, the computer applications analyst can realistically program, assembly, execute and evaluate candidate algorithms in an assembly language environment to study the truncation effects of varying the bit-length of operands.

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A Variable Datalength Assembly Language

The Variable Datalength Assembly Language (VDAL) is a System/360 symbolic language usable for analytical operational programming of the IBM System/4 Pi computer family. Employing it, the computer applications analyst can realistically program, assembly, execute and evaluate candidate algorithms in an assembly language environment to study the truncation effects of varying the bit-length of operands.

The length o operands used in VDAL is not restricted, but can be specified by the user at assembly time and can vary from 7 to 32 bits. This feature makes the language usable for comparative analysis of competitive machine architectures. Results obtained via VDAL are bit-equivalent to those obtained from an IBM System/4 Pi machine which has the same data word length.

Programs assembled using VDAL can be executed under executive control of a System/360 FORTRAN coded main program. Utility routines are available to place data into and retrieve it from the VDAL program. All input/output instructions in the VDAL program transfer control to an appropriate FORTRAN subprogram supplied by the user. Thus, realistic dynamic environments fur the VDAL program can be constructed using FORTRAN.

VDAL is implemented using the macro facility of the System/360 Assembler (F level) and is, in fact, imbedded in that assembly language. Thus, almost all of the features of the System/360 Assembler are available to VDAL and form a very powerful and easy to use analytical programming tool.

The source language statements representing an algorithm, or application module, ar...