Browse Prior Art Database

Optical Recording on a Flexible Medium

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000074433D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-23
Document File: 3 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Eaton, JH: AUTHOR

Abstract

This device for optically reading and writing on a flexible medium is comprised of: 1) A transparent cylinder 1 on the outside surface of which a tape 2 is wrapped, as shown in A. The active surface 4 of the tape is in contact with the outside of the transparent cylinder 1. 2) An interior transparent cylinder 3 fitted inside the interior surface of the outer cylinder with a clearance appropriate to be used as an air bearing 5. 3) A multiplicity of optical systems and deflectors for imaging optical sources interior to the transparent cylinder 3 onto the active surface of the tape (this is approximately the outer surface of the transparent cylinder 1). Each optical system is capable of imaging its source(s) on a multiplicity of "tracks" on the tape 2.

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Optical Recording on a Flexible Medium

This device for optically reading and writing on a flexible medium is comprised of:
1) A transparent cylinder 1 on the outside surface of which a

tape 2 is wrapped, as shown in A. The active surface 4 of

the tape is in contact with the outside of the transparent

cylinder 1.
2) An interior transparent cylinder 3 fitted inside the

interior surface of the outer cylinder with a clearance

appropriate to be used as an air bearing 5.
3) A multiplicity of optical systems and deflectors for imaging

optical sources interior to the transparent cylinder 3 onto

the active surface of the tape (this is approximately the

outer surface of the transparent cylinder 1). Each optical

system is capable of imaging its source(s) on a multiplicity

of "tracks" on the tape 2. There are sufficient optical

systems to "cover" the width of the tape with tracks. A

typical optical system is shown in B.

In operation, the transparent cylinders 3 and 1 are free to rotate with respect to each other, and the tape 2 can be fed on and off of 1 as 1 rotates. The contact between the outer surface of the cylinder 1 and the tape is nonsliding. The optical system is fixed with respect to the cylinder 3. In one mode of operation the cylinder 3 (and therefore the optical systems inside it) rotates at a constant speed. In this mode, points on the tape wrapped around 1 can be addressed (read or written) even if 1 is not rotating. Different sections of tape can be brought into the addressable field by rotating the cylinder 1. The cylinder 1 can be rotated to bring different sections into the addressable field, while the sections already in the addressable field are being wri...