Browse Prior Art Database

Quick Acting Drier for Liquid Cooling Systems

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000074459D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-23
Document File: 2 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Aakalum, NG: AUTHOR

Abstract

As electronic components have been made smaller, cooling has become a problem, since the area for heat transfer has been considerably reduced. It would appear, that immersion type cooling using the new fluorocarbon liquids has solved the problem. These liquids have a low boiling point so that cooling or heat removal by boiling is possible. However, water interferes with the efficiency of these liquids. The fluorocarbon liquids become contaminated with water from the ambient air. Accordingly, driers have been utilized within the system to absorb the water in vapor form. The drier has been usually placed within the vapor space above the fluorocarbon liquid 10 in the supply tank 12. The removal of the water vapor has been very slow since it is fed to the drier by diffusion within the chamber.

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Quick Acting Drier for Liquid Cooling Systems

As electronic components have been made smaller, cooling has become a problem, since the area for heat transfer has been considerably reduced. It would appear, that immersion type cooling using the new fluorocarbon liquids has solved the problem. These liquids have a low boiling point so that cooling or heat removal by boiling is possible. However, water interferes with the efficiency of these liquids. The fluorocarbon liquids become contaminated with water from the ambient air. Accordingly, driers have been utilized within the system to absorb the water in vapor form. The drier has been usually placed within the vapor space above the fluorocarbon liquid 10 in the supply tank 12. The removal of the water vapor has been very slow since it is fed to the drier by diffusion within the chamber. The present arrangement, as shown, places a small condenser 14 within the drying material 16 so that the fluorocarbon vapor 18 must pass through the drier 16 to get to the condenser 14. The condensation process at the condenser causes convection of the vapors, thus circulating the fluorocarbon vapor 18 through the drier 16. The drier 16 tends to absorb the water vapor and has little effect on the fluorocarbon vapors 18. The drier 16 is surrounded by a porous wall 20 to pass the vapors. The condenser 14 can be a portion of the main condenser or a separate condenser as shown.

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