Browse Prior Art Database

Air Mixing Box

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000074557D
Original Publication Date: 1971-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-23
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Marton, MB: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a suspended ceiling mountable air mixing box for a high-heat density area such as a computer room. The device performs the function of reducing heat concentration to acceptable levels, without the need for expanding and/or modifying an existing conventional air conditioning system. It is particularly applicable in an area containing a computer system, since computer system components reject such great quantities of heat in a concentrated area that, quite often, computer malfunction occurs.

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Air Mixing Box

Disclosed is a suspended ceiling mountable air mixing box for a high-heat density area such as a computer room. The device performs the function of reducing heat concentration to acceptable levels, without the need for expanding and/or modifying an existing conventional air conditioning system. It is particularly applicable in an area containing a computer system, since computer system components reject such great quantities of heat in a concentrated area that, quite often, computer malfunction occurs.

In the drawings, Fig. A is a three-dimensional view of the apparatus Fig. B is a view taken along line B-B of Fig. A and Fig. C is a view taken along line C-C of Fig. B. In operation, primary air enters a mixing chamber 10 through fixed converging nozzles 12 which may suitably be 1/2 inch. Secondary air enters mixing chamber 10 through a variable-vane nozzle 14 which enables the altering of the mixing ratios of primary and secondary air. The final outflow pattern can be adjusted with the employment of the adjustable outlet louvers 16.

Thus, the inputs to the box are; primary air which may be at a medium pressure, i.e., 2'' or more, at a temperature of 55 degrees F or greater, the primary air being ducted in with a flexible ductwork; and secondary air, the hot stagnant air which accumulates over computing frames. A suitable mixing ratio of primary to secondary air may be 1:1 to 1:2 depending upon the primary air pressure.

The foregoing provides many a...