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Browse Prior Art Database

Multi-Level Imprinting Micro-Tools

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000074595D
Publication Date: 2005-Feb-23
Document File: 3 page(s) / 119K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method that forms a trace and via layer by using a single layer of photo resist; this creates a multi-level imprinting micro-tool. Benefits include better alignment between the trace and via layers in the micro-tool.

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Multi-Level Imprinting Micro-Tools

Disclosed is a method that forms a trace and via layer by using a single layer of photo resist; this creates a multi-level imprinting micro-tool. Benefits include better alignment between the trace and via layers in the micro-tool.

Background

Resist uniformity, flatness, and cracking at the interface between the two resist layers are current process quality issues. Currently, it require up to two weeks in the lithographic process for the resist application, soft bake, hard bake, and exposure to be completed. Alignment of the second litho mask to the undeveloped features on the first layer is difficult. The starting surface for the micro-tool manufacture does not contain any litho alignment marks. The depth of focus is limited to several microns, using a step-and-repeat or projection litho tool. This limits the critical dimension control on micro-tool features.

The current method to make an imprinting micro-tool requires the application of two or more layers of photo resist (see Figure 1). The first resist layer is applied, soft baked; a litho mask is aligned, and then exposed. The first layer is then hard baked. The second resist layer is applied, soft baked, mask aligned, and hard baked. To reduce the tendency for the thick photo resist (e.g. 20 – 50 microns) to crack, hard baking takes place over several days.

General Description

The disclosed method uses one layer of photo resist to create a multi-level imprinting micro-tool (see Figure 2). The multiple layers are created using a scanning laser litho tool. The photo resist is controlled by the laser scanning speed. Focus is n...