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Analog Method of Making Ultrasonic and Microwave Kinoforms

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000074628D
Original Publication Date: 1971-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-23
Document File: 2 page(s) / 26K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Boyer, AL: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

A method of manufacturing lenses operative at the microwave and ultrasonic frequences by means of kinoform techniques is illustrated. The object is illuminated by sources of diffuse incoherent ultra-sound or microwaves. The radiation scattered off the object is detected at the scan plane. In the simplest embodiment, this can be done using a simple scanning transducer which may be a piezoelectric detector or microwave horn. The incident radiation may be described by the complex amplitude W, W(a) = A(a)e/i phi(a)/. where A(a) is the amplitude at some scan position a and phi(a) is the phase at that same point.

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Analog Method of Making Ultrasonic and Microwave Kinoforms

A method of manufacturing lenses operative at the microwave and ultrasonic frequences by means of kinoform techniques is illustrated. The object is illuminated by sources of diffuse incoherent ultra-sound or microwaves. The radiation scattered off the object is detected at the scan plane. In the simplest embodiment, this can be done using a simple scanning transducer which may be a piezoelectric detector or microwave horn. The incident radiation may be described by the complex amplitude W, W(a) = A(a)e/i phi(a)/. where A(a) is the amplitude at some scan position a and phi(a) is the phase at that same point.

At typical ultrasonic and microwave frequencies, the scanning transducer is sensitive to the complex amplitude rather than to the intensity, as is true of optical detectors. The output of the transducer can, therefore, be analyzed in a vector voltmeter to provide both the phase and the amplitude of the wavefront W(a). The output of the vector voltmeter can be used to drive a milling machine or other tool to form a relief surface proportional to the phase phi(a). The result is an ultrasonic, or microwave kinoform lens. If the criterion of diffuse scattering is sufficiently met in the wave W(a), the wavefront will have nearly constant amplitude A(a)=A , and it is sufficient to reproduce only the phase distribution phi(a), in order to make a satisfactory reconstruction of W(a).

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