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Electrooptical Scanner

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000074665D
Original Publication Date: 1971-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-23
Document File: 3 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fleisher, H: AUTHOR

Abstract

This electrooptic beam positioning apparatus features economical use of materials, simplified control logic, megacycle rates of beam displacement and reduced optical transmission losses. Referring to Fig. 1, the apparatus includes two corner reflectors 1, 1', electrooptic crystal 2, integral bottom electrode 3, segmented top electrodes 4, calcite crystal 5 and optically matched immersion medium 6. At the calcite crystal, light 7 is either reflected to external equipment in output beam paths 8 or transmitted for further internal handling as beam 9.

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Electrooptical Scanner

This electrooptic beam positioning apparatus features economical use of materials, simplified control logic, megacycle rates of beam displacement and reduced optical transmission losses. Referring to Fig. 1, the apparatus includes two corner reflectors 1, 1', electrooptic crystal 2, integral bottom electrode 3, segmented top electrodes 4, calcite crystal 5 and optically matched immersion medium 6. At the calcite crystal, light 7 is either reflected to external equipment in output beam paths 8 or transmitted for further internal handling as beam 9.

Operation of the apparatus is seen in the top view of Fig. 2. At element 5 linearly polarized light originated at laser 10 is either totally reflected (out of the plane of the page) as extraordinary beam 8-1 or totally transmitted as ordinary beam 9, depending upon the state of rotation of the plane of polarization of the received beam 7. This rotation state is governed by the voltage applied between top electrode segment 4-1 and bottom electrode 3.

Transmitted light 9, after multiple reflections at end reflectors 1, is subjected to the field of top electrode segment 4-2 where its polarization is again conditioned for selection at 5; either for external reflection as an extraordinary beam 8-2 or further internal transmission as an ordinary beam. At 4-3 the ordinary transmitted beam is once again conditioned for selective reflection at 8-3 or further internal transmission.

Thus electrode segments 4-1 through 4-3 have decreasingly ranked influence upon the course of the beam. If the beam is reflected at 4-1 the voltages at 4-2 and 4-3 have no effect; the voltage at 4-3 being effective only when the beam has been transmitted by the effects of 4-1 and 4-2.

By interposing a second multie...