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Metal Vapor Discharge Tube

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000074702D
Original Publication Date: 1971-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-23
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Zarowin, CB: AUTHOR

Abstract

A vapor of metals or semimetals having high melting points is provided in a metal vapor discharge tube without auxiliary heating of such materials. Tube 1 including reflectors 2 and 3 at brewster angle contains a rare gas. The gas is excited by electrodes 4 and 5 and power source 6 to provide an electrical discharge.

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Metal Vapor Discharge Tube

A vapor of metals or semimetals having high melting points is provided in a metal vapor discharge tube without auxiliary heating of such materials. Tube 1 including reflectors 2 and 3 at brewster angle contains a rare gas. The gas is excited by electrodes 4 and 5 and power source 6 to provide an electrical discharge.

A compound of a metal or semimetal and a nonmetallic radical is contained in vessel 7 which is connected to tube 1 through valve 8. The compound in vessel 7 which has a vapor pressure greater than about one torr at the temperature of the discharge tube (about 300 degrees C) will be in the vapor state as a result of the heat produced by the discharge. When valve 8 is opened, the compound enters discharge tube 1 and the discharge causes excitation of the compound (and in the case of some compounds, causes ionization) which causes decomposition. After decomposition the metal molecules and the nonmetallic radical molecules recombine upon collision, the discharge continues to cause decomposition and a state of equilibrium is reached, and there exists a concentration of metal vapor which is excited into the lasing condition.

Examples of the compound are AlB(3), Sbl(3), Be8(2)H(8), CCl(4), FeCl(2), Mof(6), Si(2)H(6) and UF(6). Other compounds are obtained from, for example, the list by Daniel R. Stull in Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, 39, 517 (1947).

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