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Peak Pulser

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000074727D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-23
Document File: 2 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Frankeny, RF: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This peak pulser is insensitive to amplitude or frequency variations. The pulser is responsive to positive peaks; similar pulsers can be constructed to be responsive to negative peaks.

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Peak Pulser

This peak pulser is insensitive to amplitude or frequency variations. The pulser is responsive to positive peaks; similar pulsers can be constructed to be responsive to negative peaks.

The positive peaks of input signal 10 are detected and indicated by pulses 20 on output terminal 11. In response to input signal 10, first differential amplifier 12 charges capacitor 14 through feedback diode 13 with voltage signal 15. The negative transitions of signal 15 correspond to the negative zero crossings of input signal 10; and the peaks of signal 15 also correspond to the peaks of signal
10. When Vin is increasing, positive amplifier 12 charges capacitor 14 through diode 13. Signal 17 on line 18 is a replica of signal 10 until a positive peak in signal 10 occurs.

As soon as any positive peak of signal 10 occurs, diode 13 becomes reversed biased. Capacitor 14 holds at the peak amplitude. A differential voltage appears between the input terminal Vin and capacitor 14 causing amplifier 12 to reverse its conduction. As a result, signal 17 has a large negative transition corresponding to the peak of signals 10 and 15. This transition is a precise indication of the signal 10 positive peak. As soon as signal 10 passes into the negative region, second differential amplifier 21 becomes current conductive rapidly discharging capacitor 14 through diode 16 causing the negative transitions in signal 15.

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