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Browse Prior Art Database

Power Line Disturbance Support Circuit

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000074742D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-23
Document File: 3 page(s) / 48K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Tenley, RA: AUTHOR

Abstract

This circuit arrangement provides a module 10 which can be added to a conventional power supply circuit 12 to provide load 14 with protection from the effects of voltage dips or outages at the power source terminals 16.

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Power Line Disturbance Support Circuit

This circuit arrangement provides a module 10 which can be added to a conventional power supply circuit 12 to provide load 14 with protection from the effects of voltage dips or outages at the power source terminals 16.

The basic power supply may typically include a transformer 18 energizing a full-wave rectifier arrangement 20, 22, together with bulk capacitors 24 and a voltage regulator 26. The showing of this portion of the circuit is simplified but illustrates the basic elements of rectification, bulk storage and regulation with which module 10 cooperates.

Module 10 includes a voltage multiplier 28, a storage capacitor CS, a low-voltage detector circuit 30, and a series pass device SCR1.

During normal operation, the main rectifiers 20, 22 supply pulses of energy to the bulk capacitors 24 which in turn provide energy continuously to the voltage regulator 26. Voltage multiplier 28 charges CS to a peak voltage which is a multiple of the peak voltage of the bulk capacitors 24. When a power line disturbance such as a momentary outage occurs, the voltage across bulk capacitors 24 drops until it activates voltage detector 30. Detector 30 turns on SCR1 which transfers energy from CS to the bulk capacitor bank 24 until the charge in the capacitors is depleted or power at terminal 16 is restored.

In the example shown, capacitors C1 and CS, resistors R1 and diodes CR1 and CR2 make up the conventional cascade voltage doubler circuit 28. When transformer secondary terminal 32 goes negative, capacitor C1 charges up through diode CR2 and resistor R1. When 32 goes positive, the voltage presented to the storage capacitor CS is approximately twice the voltage across the transformer winding. CS will charge up to twice the peak transformer wi...