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Browse Prior Art Database

Synthesis of Organometallic Complexes for Glass Ceramic Metallization

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000074755D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-23
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bakos, P: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In this process various metal complexes are synthesized and subsequently used for depositing metallic layers on ceramic, glass, or semiconductor material.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 98% of the total text.

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Synthesis of Organometallic Complexes for Glass Ceramic Metallization

In this process various metal complexes are synthesized and subsequently used for depositing metallic layers on ceramic, glass, or semiconductor material.

Organometallic complexes are very unstable at elevated temperatures and under regular or inert atmosphere they can be decomposed to base metal. Several metal complexes can be synthesized including chromium, copper, gold, palladium. The metal compounds are dissolved in amines, amides, imides, etc. They are reacted at a temperature in the range of 35-50 degrees C for 1 to 4 hours.

By way of example, Pd (NH(3))(2)(NO(2))(2) is dissolved in allylamine with mild agitation and reacted at 40 degrees C for 2 hours. During the reaction, the unshared electrons from R-NH(2) enter the coordination sphere of the Pd/+2/ to form a new complex. The resultant compound is sprayed, spun or dip coated to form a uniform microlayer on the substrate. Upon exposure to elevated temperatures (200-500 degrees C) under inert or ambient, the palladium complex is decomposed to pure metal. Complexes of other metals can be synthesized in generally the same manner. For example, Cu (OOCH(3))(2), CuCl(2), CuBr, HAu Cl(4).H(2)O,CrCl(3), CrCl(2), etc. are dissolved in allylamine (CH(2) = CH CH(2) NH(2)) and, after reaction, the metal complexes can be coated onto the desired substrate and reduced to pure metal. An advantage lies in the superior adhesion of the reduced complex to...