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Injection Laser for Ambient Temperature Operation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000074921D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 24K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Stern, F: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A conventional injection laser has an active layer in which electron-hole recombination takes place which is located primarily in P-type material, because injection in PN junctions tends to be from the high-mobility N-type side to the low-mobility P-type side.

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Injection Laser for Ambient Temperature Operation

A conventional injection laser has an active layer in which electron-hole recombination takes place which is located primarily in P-type material, because injection in PN junctions tends to be from the high-mobility N-type side to the low- mobility P-type side.

In the laser structure shown, the active layer is primarily in N-type material. Both hole confinement and radiation confinement in the N-type side of the junction is achieved by the structure of the figure. Recombination on the N-type side of the junction is encouraged by the use of a heterojunction injecting contact which inhibits electron flow from the active layer into the inactive layer.

The use of N-type material of the indicated carrier concentration results in higher thresholds at low temperatures than those attained in the conventional structures, because of the greater spectral line-width associated with the smaller electron effective mass. However, at higher temperatures, the N-type material has a lower threshold because the degeneracy is maintained. Optimum operation at or near room temperature occurs for electron concentrations of about 3 x 10/18/ to 5 x 10/18//cc. Compensation in the active layer favors operation at room temperature and above.

This structure is achieved by growing Ga(1-x)Al(x)As P-type layers on GaAs N-type substrates. In particular a Ga(1-x)Al(x)As layer is grown from a melt containing 20 gms Ga, 3 gms GaAs 0.022 gms Zn, 0.150...