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Method for Concurrent Assembling and Checking of the Assembled Output Under the Disk Operating System (DOS)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000074955D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Safer, J: AUTHOR

Abstract

Whenever system files are assigned to a direct access device, DOS maintain the next address to be used for each file in a table called the Disk Information Block (DIB). Under a DOS batched job foreground supervisor, one or two assemblers can run in the foreground partitions, each having its SYSLST file assigned to disk. Verification programs can then run in the background partition scanning the assembler SYSLST records right after the assembler has written them. The verification program stays behind the assembler by checking the disk address in the DIB before each read and, if necessary, looping until the address is incremented past the record it wants to read. An example of a program using this technique is described in detail in SDD Technical Report TR01.

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Method for Concurrent Assembling and Checking of the Assembled Output Under the Disk Operating System (DOS)

Whenever system files are assigned to a direct access device, DOS maintain the next address to be used for each file in a table called the Disk Information Block (DIB). Under a DOS batched job foreground supervisor, one or two assemblers can run in the foreground partitions, each having its SYSLST file assigned to disk. Verification programs can then run in the background partition scanning the assembler SYSLST records right after the assembler has written them. The verification program stays behind the assembler by checking the disk address in the DIB before each read and, if necessary, looping until the address is incremented past the record it wants to read. An example of a program using this technique is described in detail in SDD Technical Report TR01.1409, dated January 15, 1971, published by International Business Machines Corporation.

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