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Three Lead Point Selector for a Twelve Lead ECG Analysis Program

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000075028D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 31K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bonner, R: AUTHOR

Abstract

It is known that many of the points on an electrocardiographic (ECG) signal provide no useful information. Accordingly, various techniques have been developed to select only those points which contain significant and useful information. One known technique, used in the single lead arrangement, involves dividing the slope domain S into zones so that whenever the monitored slope function changes zone, a point is sampled.

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Three Lead Point Selector for a Twelve Lead ECG Analysis Program

It is known that many of the points on an electrocardiographic (ECG) signal provide no useful information. Accordingly, various techniques have been developed to select only those points which contain significant and useful information. One known technique, used in the single lead arrangement, involves dividing the slope domain S into zones so that whenever the monitored slope function changes zone, a point is sampled.

Some difficulty is encountered, however, when such a technique is used in the three-lead case. In particular, it is possible in the three-lead case for slope reversals to occur, in the zone of highest change, with no accompanied zone change and, therefore, sample point.

Three typical simultaneously recorded wave shapes, representing the same events in an ECG, but from different "views" of the heart are shown in the figure. At any given time, say T(A), a three-dimensional slope can be calculated, using the expression:

(Image Omitted)

then, whenever the slope function changes zone, a point may be selected on all three wave shapes.

It can be seen from the figure that between points T(B) and T(C) the slope function may easily rise above K(1) and remain there resulting in only points at T(B) and T(C) being selected. To obtain points in the region between T(B) and T(C),an additional condition or rule for selecting points may be added. Such a rule may require that whenever S is in zone I, a...