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Electrophotographic Plate

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000075100D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kanazawa, KK: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

An electroconductive substrate is coated with a layer which consists essentially of equal atomic proportions of selenium and sulfur.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 96% of the total text.

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Electrophotographic Plate

An electroconductive substrate is coated with a layer which consists essentially of equal atomic proportions of selenium and sulfur.

The entire preparation is conducted in such a way as to improve the homogeneity, and to facilitate reaction between the sulfur and the selenium in order to maximize the formation of Se(8-x)S(x) molecular ring compounds, particularly where x=4. This objective is accomplished by melting together very pure selenium and sulfur under vacuum (10/-6/ torr) in a sealed tube which is rotated. The molten mass is then cooled and allowed to solidify. This resulting solid selenium-sulfur material is then evaporated at about 200 degrees C under an initial vacuum of 10/-6/ torr onto various substrates, including flexible materials like aluminum and aluminum covered polyethyleneterephthalate.

The temperature of the substrate during evaporation is important. It is essential that the temperature be held between 50 degrees C and 80 degrees C. Outstanding results have been obtained at 55 degrees C. The process takes approximately one hour. The photoconductive films obtained are very smooth, shiny, flexible, and tough, and therefore have the physical properties necessary for use in the electrophotographic process, either in the form of a flexible belt or on a fixed drum.

The electrophotographic properties of these films are further improved by applying a tellurium containing overcoat, or by co-evaporating selenium-tellurium or...