Browse Prior Art Database

Field Effect Controlled Storage Panel

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000075117D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 24K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Duncombe, CX: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Illustrated is a field-effect controlled optical storage panel, which comprises a zinc oxide control layer 1 deposited on a plexiglass substrate 4. Embedded in channels of the surface of the plexiglass substrate are an electroluminescent phosphor material 2 and at the bottom of the grooves are transparent conductive electrodes 3. The present structure has advantages over known display panels since adjacent electrodes or lines are not connected by a layer of electroluminescent phosphor, whereby leakage current is eliminated and the background illumination is controlled entirely by the conductance of the zinc oxide control layer.

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Field Effect Controlled Storage Panel

Illustrated is a field-effect controlled optical storage panel, which comprises a zinc oxide control layer 1 deposited on a plexiglass substrate 4. Embedded in channels of the surface of the plexiglass substrate are an electroluminescent phosphor material 2 and at the bottom of the grooves are transparent conductive electrodes 3. The present structure has advantages over known display panels since adjacent electrodes or lines are not connected by a layer of electroluminescent phosphor, whereby leakage current is eliminated and the background illumination is controlled entirely by the conductance of the zinc oxide control layer. The thickness of the electroluminescent phosphor is determined by the depth of the grooves giving a high degree of control of the thickness and thus more uniform brightness over the surface of the table.

The panel is made in the following manner. A die chemically etched from a conventional copper clad fiber glass board is hot-pressed into a plexiglass substrate of the desired dimensions. This produces an imprint of the electrode pattern in the plexiglass. Two advantages of this technique are that the etch used for the copper does not attack the photoresist so that fabrication of the die is more precise and better resolutions can be obtained. The other is that once a good die is obtained, it can be used to produce many panels.

The transparent conductive layer can be produced by the following methods. Th...