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Controlling and Reducing Stresses in Photoresist or Polymeric Films During Drying

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000075146D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-24
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cortellino, CA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Any furnace into which air at 100% relative humidity (RH) at room temperature can be introduced is used for drying films. By monitoring the temperature, the RH can be changed. This in turn regulates the rate of film drying.

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Controlling and Reducing Stresses in Photoresist or Polymeric Films During Drying

Any furnace into which air at 100% relative humidity (RH) at room temperature can be introduced is used for drying films. By monitoring the temperature, the RH can be changed. This in turn regulates the rate of film drying.

Polymers, including photoresist materials, exhibit elastic and viscoelastic properties whose magnitude is influenced by the ambient treatment. By controlling and optimizing the process variables, the internal stresses can be minimized.

A furnace, into which water saturated air is introduced, is used to control the processing variables. As the room temperature saturated air moves in the furnace, the temperature is increased (while the amount of water remains constant), causing a drop in the relative humidity.

When a wet film is in equilibrium with a saturated atmosphere, very little drying takes place. If the equilibrium is disturbed, by changing the RH, solvent can evaporate from the film. Evaporation rates can be controlled by changing equilibrium conditions, i.e., temperature or incoming air.

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